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Eleraan

Stills Burn time

13 posts in this topic

So I've been playing with the burn time on my stills again.  And I noticed that a still produces .26-.27 with just being lit.  And produces .9-1.2 with being fueled by a full log after being lit, based on lag of course.  So we're looking at a log being worth 4 kindling?   While its easier to just toss a log on the still than relight it 4 extra times the resource cost seems a bit off for the burn time.  Basically, Is it intended that a log only equal 4 kindling as far as fuel?

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Posted (edited)

Kindling got a "buff" some years back with the mere act of starting a fire in forge/over/campfire etc being a lot more efficient than continuously  fueling with wood scraps etc. You can use less wood overall by continuously snuffing and relighting your forge every few minutes, but I don;t think it was intended to give all fuel a major buff, this was more (I believe?) geared more to new players who got frustrated lighting a forge only t have it go out again 90 seconds later. It's cheaper on resources but more demanding on time/attention if you want to keep relighting a forge rather than just fueling it after its lit.. 

 

I suspect they are more likely to nerf kindling back to original levels than to buff all other fuels, but it certainly is not an issue that only affects stills.

 

 

Edited by Brash_Endeavors

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Hmm, I figure your correct.

 

While we are on still burn times I've tested, and its sporadic it seems with lag, but the difference in burn time for an 8ql and a 70ql still equals about 8% more distilled. Maybe improve the burn time based on quality, I don't know about other things but that seems kinda small of an increase for the effort.  Also, difference between the 8 and 50 seems to be nothing. I've had the 8 distill more than the 50 several times.  

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Posted (edited)

I believe birchwood also has an extended burn time, so make sure to use the same type of wood in your tests. (Birch might be the only exceptional one, I dunno)

 

Wood quality has never played a difference in burn time that I know of but they might consider it. Most people use peat or wood scraps instead of logs, since its a good way to use up wood scraps.

 

Wood scraps tend by nature to be extremely low quality if they are a byproduct of making planks etc vs making fuel from whole logs.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Brash_Endeavors
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I'll test with birch next.  I use wood scraps too but using 14 wood scrap combined to hit at least 20 kg (Which I think is the max fuel amount I've tried testing but never could confirm)  you would need around 504 wood scraps per barrel of whiskey.  It runs about 36 logs to distill a barrel.   It just seems making a single barrel of say whiskey is a bit resource intensive for the benefits.  Its not bad to make, 46 rye per barrel but its 36ish logs/504 woodscrap to distill one barrel.  And it provides around the same benefits as just brewing a barrel of ale.  The balance for effort vs rewards seems a bit off from my perspective on the distilled beverages.  Not that any of this is going to stop me from making it as I enjoy it but thought I'd look at it from a balance perspective.  

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12 minutes ago, Eleraan said:

I'll test with birch next.  I use wood scraps too but using 14 wood scrap combined to hit at least 20 kg (Which I think is the max fuel amount I've tried testing but never could confirm)  you would need around 504 wood scraps per barrel of whiskey.  It runs about 36 logs to distill a barrel.   It just seems making a single barrel of say whiskey is a bit resource intensive for the benefits.  Its not bad to make, 46 rye per barrel but its 36ish logs/504 woodscrap to distill one barrel.  And it provides around the same benefits as just brewing a barrel of ale.  The balance for effort vs rewards seems a bit off from my perspective on the distilled beverages.  Not that any of this is going to stop me from making it as I enjoy it but thought I'd look at it from a balance perspective.  

But affinity time you get is much longer for distilled drinks than for beer, 0.2kg of 30ish brandy gives me more than 1h(i can only imagine the higher ql ones) and same amount of 60ish beer gives me 45 minutes. And also distils can age, I have use for my early under 10ql whiskey and others which i cannot say for my early beers xD

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Posted (edited)

yes people have commented before on the extreme amount of time needed to distill spirits, those most complaints seem to be in terms of time rather than in fuel costs. I guess fuel becomes in issue for large scale brewing. 

 

I believe peat is the most efficient though I never use peat much myself. You are correct that 20kg is the "full" limit and any fuel above that is wasted. 

 

I do not know how much more efficient birch is, just that it takes less birch. Maybe this means test with 10kg of each not 20kg to test times -- it's likely that 20kg of birch is wasting a good deal of it and you need to use smaller amounts to benefit.  

 

http://www.wurmpedia.com/index.php/Birch

 

 

 

 

Edited by Brash_Endeavors

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I drank some 50ql whiskey yesterday. .2kg gave me just 1 hour. I'll test it vs ale I think I have a 60ql barrel laying around.  I would expect brandy to be even higher than whiskey as it takes wine as its base vs just a few crops thrown in a barrel but never know.  As for aging I'll have to monitor a 50 or 60ql starting whiskey for aging time. I know at lower ql it was going up about 1ql a day but seemed to slow down.  I need to test if the 50ql wine barrels I'm using are any faster vs creation ql ones. 

 

As for the time it takes to distill the drinks I don't mind, although it would be nice not to have to run and refuel them all ever couple hours. I run 21 stills and honestly never gave it any thought on the fuel stuff until I started doing the math and figured I've gone through 30,000+ kg in fuel so far between logs, wood scraps, and some peat for like 50 barrels distilled. 

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Posted (edited)

 

I know with forges,  high quality forge burns MUCH longer on same amount of fuel, so also test whether high quality stills burn longer on same amount of fuel.  

 

This may also explain why you see variations in burn times. You may need 90Q stills to run an efficient large scale distillery with 21 stills

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Brash_Endeavors
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How much longer will it burn between 70 and 90 though? Based off using forges to compare?  It would need to be a considerable amount to warrant the extra difficulty to get it to 90. Don't have the ore to try it yet well and short smithing skill a little.  I'll test it once I get the chance but I'm hoping for more than an 8% increase or it still won't really make much of a difference. Maybe a log or two per barrel which all considered isn't too big a deal at that point.

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Stills burn longer than forges if I recall.

 

Also, birch does not burn longer, it simply counts as more fuel (therotical example is say 10kgs of birch burning as long as 15kgs of cedar not sure of the exact numbers but  that's how it works, it simply counts as more fuel.

 

of course, the 20kg cap renders it null and void, as that's the hard cap, regardless of which wood type you use.

 

 

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One peat weighs 10.00kg. The Wurmpedia states: "When used as a fuel, 10kg of peat is equivalent to 20kg of wood.", which I never realized. So if you are concerned with fuel efficiency and have a peat area nearby I would think that would be the way to go.

 

=Ayes=

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I used to at my old deed but not this one. Still that would be about 36 peat per barrel.  It just seemed like a lot of time and materials went into the distilled drinks and they arn't that much better than just a brewed beer.  Still need to go through my barrels and find a comparable whiskey and beer to test. 

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