Zerocool

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About Zerocool

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  1. I said your code not the existing code. If you touch it you own it. You become "they guy" to ask about how it works. You want your code to be the easy part to read. Don't touch the parts you don't need to change unless you spot a bug. Any time you are performing checks that influence server side behavior, you wanna do them on the server side if at all possible. You cannot trust your client for a number of reasons. Keep the problem small down to what it is. You are looking to prevent an existing behavior given a flag as input. The reasonable place to start is where the behavior is already being triggered.
  2. Good! If you get in the habit of taking a peek at the logic whenever you get curious about how something works or if something is possible, you will learn a lot. Even if you don't find what you are looking for, you will get more familiar with how the project is structured and you will find it becomes easier to navigate and to read over time. You can do a whole bunch of checks to accomplish a block of logic, but just because you can see the logic in your head being possible doesn't make it simple. The more state you have to track, the more bugs you will have. Your code will become increasingly complex and less readable as you patch that out. You want the next guy who maintains your code to want to hug you, not shank you. Internally, they probably aren't checking every tile that you step to for permissions every time. They probably have a callback set up to have whatever manages player movement inform whatever manages deed security that a check is relevant to run. You could piggyback off of that a bit by passing the flag about auto travel and doing the comparison just in part of the callback. You don't need to be looking backwards in time through logging to figure out if you should be doing something now. You don't need to move the player, you just need to stop them and maybe present a warning on starting the trip. You don't need to check what guards should be responding to, let the existing logic handle that. If you can keep the server side logic to "if they are gonna do the bad, don't let them do the bad" and then make it the client's responsibility to convey why, the server won't have to do the legwork and can get back to servicing the next operation for someone else.
  3. You could crack open WU and take a look for yourself how kos works. Empower yourself! That is a lot of unnecessary checks though.
  4. Oh man he used the holy rite of precedent. That has never been overturned. Well, guess the feature has to be rolled back. Anything else on the agenda for automating GM duties? I'm all for automation. Give people back their time to relax and enjoy themselves or come up with weird event stuff.
  5. You heard him, pave everything. Make the trees into coal first.
  6. What if you spent even more money on an outer deed for linking your highway and continue to be antisocial in the inner deed?
  7. Dirt walls. With dirt walls on top of the dirt walls.
  8. I mean I'm here to shitpost and steal game mechanics from the game and the forums but ok.
  9. I remember people saying this as far back as the opening of gold 2. The game caught a few lucky bumps here and there, but it is said as often as it is in eve. That's the drawback with simulation games though. You gamble that people will be able to entertain themselves in your sandbox on the combination of features rather than the single new shiny.
  10. Nicedreams just hit the burn out moment and what he quoted just happened to be what upset him enough to recognize it is all. I like Retro. He answers rigged questions with class and somehow manages not to tell people to go pound sand when they say incendiary crap to him.
  11. My mistake. All due credits to the true Budda of sass.